FAQ's

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Why is the reconstruction of the eastbound McClugage Bridge necessary?

After more than 70 years of service to the Peoria Metro Area, the existing eastbound McClugage Bridge is structurally deficient and functionally obsolete, will not be able to accommodate future 2040 traffic projections and is nearing the end of its expected service life. Replacement of the existing structure is required to address the aging condition, underlying deficiencies and traffic capacity issues.

 

What can bridge travelers expect from the new structure?

Beyond structural security, the new bridge will increase capacity, relieve congestion, provide lane shoulders to improve safety and include a multi-use lane for pedestrians and cyclists. 

What about the westbound McClugage?

A new three-lane bridge was constructed immediately north of the original McClugage Bridge in 1982, and designated for westbound traffic. Less than half the age of the original McClugage, the westbound bridge will continue serving the region along with the newly constructed eastbound structure.

 

How much will the project cost and how is it being funded?

The project’s construction cost is approximately $167 million. The funding comes from the “Major Bridge Funds” for Illinois and is already funded as part of IDOT’s Multi-Year Program (2015-2020).

What is the timeframe for the project?

The project began in early 2014 with the environmental study process that is required by the National

Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). It is anticipated that construction of the eastbound McClugage Bridge will be complete in 2023.

 

What is the point of the multi-use bridge lane?

A 14-foot multi-use path was included in the project design to provide safe and convenient travel and enjoyment for pedestrians and bicyclists alike. The structure also includes a pedestrian overlook that extrudes from the multi-use lane, allowing visitors to step out over the Illinois River.

 

What is the environmental impact of the new bridge?

The project followed the National Environmental Policy Act study process, which is the most comprehensive mechanism available for assessing environmental impact. In September, 2017, the Federal Highway Administration issued a Finding of No Significant Impact for the proposed construction of the eastbound structure.